Seminari e workshop

 

SEMINARIO
Titolo: Using mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake as a therapeutic target for ALS
Quando: 23 Settembre 2021, ore 16:30
Dove: Il seminario si terrà Online sulla piattaforma Microsoft Teams
Relatore: Lan Wei-LaPierre, Department of Applied Physiology and Kinesiology, College of Health and Human Performance, University of Florida
Abstract: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal, adult-onset neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive motor neuron (MN) loss, muscle denervation, and eventually, paralysis. Currently, no effective treatments are available to stop or reverse ALS disease progression and the precise molecular mechanisms that underlie ALS pathogenesis remain elusive. Prior studies revealed decreased mitochondrial respiratory chain activity, altered mitochondrial ultrastructure, and mitochondrial dysfunction in both MN and skeletal muscle (SM) in ALS patients and mouse models. The first sign of ALS pathology occurs at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), where presynaptic MN axons connect with postsynaptic SM end plates. To date, whether signals resulting in the initial NMJ damage are from MN or SM remain unclear. In this project, we aim to determine the tissue-specific causative role of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in SM and MN in disease onset and progression, and the therapeutic efficacy of reducing mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake on NMJ and SM function in ALS mice. We hypothesize that mitochondrial Ca2+ mishandling in both SM and MN actively contribute to ALS disease pathogenesis and that attenuating mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake mitigates mitochondrial damage and preserves NMJ/muscle function. To test this hypothesis, we will use transgenic mice with inducible, SM or MN-specific expression of a dominant negative form of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter to specifically and selectively reduce mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in SM and MN in hSOD1G93A mice and C9-500 (C9orf72) mice, two mouse models associated with the most prevalent genetic causes for ALS. The central hypothesis will be tested in two Specific Aims. Aim 1 will determine the role of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in SM or MN in survival, motor function, NMJ function and in vivo muscle performance in hSOD1G93A and C9-500 mice. Aim 2 will assess the impact of tissue-specific inhibition of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in SM or MN on NMJ and muscle structure, MN survival, muscle intrinsic contractile properties, mitochondrial structure and mitochondrial bioenergetics in SM of hSOD1G93A and C9-500 mice. This project will: 1) provide a systematic, longitudinal characterization of SM and NMJ function from a cellular level to whole animal level at different stages of disease progression in hSOD1G93A and C9-500 mice; 2) determine the degrees to which defects in mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in SM or MN contribute to altered NMJ structure/function, disease onset and progression in hSOD1G93A and C9-500 mice; 3) provide the first detailed dissection on the relative role of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in SM and MN in ALS phenotype using the same genetic models and determine the origin of the signals that result in NMJ destruction (from SM or MN or both); 4) provide mechanistic evidence for whether mitochondrial Ca2+ mishandling is a trigger or a target for disease progression in ALS mice, regardless of the causing mutations (mitochondrial related or non-mitochondrial related); and most importantly, 5) test the validity of a potential new therapeutic target (mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, or the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter, MCU) for the treatment of ALS.
Locandina

 

SEMINARIO
Titolo: Cachessia tumorale sperimentale: differenze tra fasi precoci e tardive in diversi tipi di tumore e possibile coinvolgimento della relazione mitocondri-SR nella progressione, funzione e sopravvivenza della perdita del muscolo scheletrico
Quando: 29 Luglio 2021, ore 15:00
Dove: Il seminario si terrà Online sulla piattaforma Microsoft Teams
Relatore: D Flávia A. Guarnier, Laboratory of Muscle Pathophysiology and Adaptation, Londrina State University, Londrina, Brazil
Abstract: Cancer cachexia is a complex multifactorial syndrome characterized by involuntary and pathological weight loss, mainly due to skeletal muscle wasting, and frequently associated with a profound fatigue. These effects are often blamed for decreasing patient´s quality of life and survival. Statistics point to cachexia as a direct cause of death for 20-25% of all cancer patients, being indirect cause of more than 60%.  Regarding the pathophysiology of the syndrome, most of the data available in the literature is obtained through pre-clinical studies, which are carried out with very different experimental cancer models, most frequently at advanced cachexia stages. The most studied and best described models show decreasing in cross-sectional area of muscle fibers, and this atrophy is more likely to affect type II fibers. In addition, oxidative stress seems to be an important mediator of muscle loss and skeletal muscle ultrastructure appears to be impaired. Several studies have suggested an association between mitochondria dysfunction and skeletal muscle atrophy through disturbances in its dynamics, quality, and function. These changes would precede muscle loss, while mitophagy would be present at later stages, when muscle proteolysis is the predominant event. The oxidative stress, that is related to myofibrils proteolysis and atrophy at different cachexia stages, is pointed out as mitochondrial modifications responsibility. In the last years, our group has dedicated attention to investigate oxidative and ultrastructural modifications in mitochondria and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), and correlate with muscle loss in glycolytic and oxidative muscles in precocious stages of cancer-induced cachexia, comparing to the events shown in the late days, as the influence of proteolytic modification in survival. Recently collected data, show that, in a very early stage of an experimental model of cachexia: 1) glycolytic muscles are already more prone to mass waste, but independently of protein oxidation; 2) glycolytic fibers are already sensitive to mitochondria, and SR structural alterations; 3) these parameters are straightly correlated to membranes oxidative modifications; 4) oxidative muscles are not preserved from oxidative and structural damage; and 5) the pattern of muscle loss and structural oxidation is different among tumor types, which directly influences the adequate time for treatment and, consequently, resistance to treatment and survival. We believe these new data bring to light a useful tool to fight this devastating syndrome.
Bio:
Flávia Guarnier is assistant professor in the Department of General Pathology at Londrina State University, Brazil. She delivers courses in general pathology for health-related degrees including physiotherapy, biomedicine, nursing and medicine.
Locandina

 

CONFERENZA
Titolo: Alta sensibilità all’ambiente: analisi di un tratto tra risorse e vulnerabilità
Quando: 21 Giugno 2021, dalle ore 14:00 alle ore 18:00
Dove: Il seminario si terrà Online sulla piattaforma Zoom (link nella locandina allegata)
Relatore: Michael Pluess, Department of Biological and Experimental Psychology, Queen Mary University of London

Locandina

 

SEMINARIO
Titolo: Person-Environment Interplay from the Perspective of Environmental Sensitivity
Quando: 17 Giugno 2021, ore 16:00
Dove: Il seminario si terrà Online sulla piattaforma Microsoft Teams
Relatore: Michael Pluess, Department of Biological and Experimental Psychology, Queen Mary University of London
Abstract:
Research on person-environment interplay and on the role of individual differences in environmental sensitivity has evolved and grown substantially over the last 25 years. In this talk, I describe and summarise the breadth of research on sensitivity from the past (the first 20 years), the present (the last 5 years) and the future (the coming 10 years), discussing phenotypical, genetic and physiological markers of the trait.
Bio: Michael Pluess is a Professor in Developmental Psychology at Queen Mary University of London. Dr. Pluess’ research focuses on the study of individual differences in sensitivity to the environment across normative and adverse contexts. He is one of the leading authors in the field of Environmental Sensitivity with specific expertise in the development and validation of sensitivity measures besides significant contributions to theories of Environmental Sensitivity. His work has been funded by NIH, Elhra, and Jacobs Foundation. He leads several research projects on sensitivity including the role of sensitivity in the school context, longitudinal investigation of stability and change in the sensitivity trait, the role of individual differences in sensitivity and the wellbeing of refugee children.
Locandina

 

SEMINARI
Titolo: Emotions in decision making processess
Quando: 10 Giugno 2021, ore 11:00 & ore 12:30
Dove: I seminari si terranno in formula blended, sia su Zoom che in presenza
Relatori: Giorgio Coricelli, University of Southern California & Giuseppe Attanasi, Université Côte d’Azura
Locandina

 

SEMINARIO
Titolo: Psychobiology of Cognitive Development from Infancy to Middle Childhood
Quando: 3 Giugno 2021, ore 16:00
Dove: Il seminario si terrà Online sulla piattaforma Microsoft Teams
Relatore: Martha Ann Bell, Virginia Tech
Abstract:
In this talk, I will discuss findings from our 10-year longitudinal study on the foundations and development of regulatory cognitive processes. I will highlight our brain (EEG) research and emphasize the parenting context.  Using data from this study, I will show how very early infant attentional behaviors and brain electrophysiology lay the foundation for more complex cognition and later academic achievement.
Bio: Martha Ann Bell is a University Distinguished Professor, College of Science Faculty Fellow, and Professor of Psychology at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University ("Virginia Tech"), where she has been on faculty since 1996. Dr. Bell’s research focuses on the cognitive, emotion, and psychophysiological processes associated with frontal lobe development in infants and children. Her work has been funded by the US Federal Government National Institutes of Health (NIH) since 2003, with current funding also from National Science Foundation. She was the 2020 recipient of the Rovee-Collier Mentor Award from the International Society for Developmental Psychobiology (ISDP) and the ISDP 2019 Senior Investigator Award winner.  Within the past decade, her service to the profession includes elected member of the Executive Board of ISDP, elected member of the Executive Board of the American Psychology Association (Developmental division), Editor of the international journal INFANCY, and Chair of the Cognition & Perception study section at NIH.  Dr. Bell is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and of the Association for Psychological Science.
Locandina

 

SEMINARIO
Titolo: La figura del Neuropsicologo in Italia
Quando: 27 Maggio 2021, ore 11:00
Dove: I seminari si terranno online per gli studenti/sse dell'UdA su piattaforma Microsoft Teams
Relatori: Dott.ssa Alessandra Onida & Dott.ssa Anna De Nigris
Locandina

 

SEMINARIO
Titolo
: Neuromodulation of cognitive functions using visuomotor adaptation paradigms
Quando: 13 Maggio 2021, ore 15:00
Dove: Il seminario si terrà Online sulla piattaforma Microsoft Teams
Relatore: Massimiliano Oliveri, Department of Psychology, University of Palermo
Abstract: Non-invasive neuromodulation techniques, such as TMS, tDCS, and tACS, have been increasingly used to modulate brain excitability in both healthy subjects and patients with brain damage. Recent advances in this field of research proved the visuomotor adaptation using prismatic adaptation can also modulate cortical excitability depending on the direction of visual distortion, i.e. with an increase of cortical excitability of parieto-frontal regions of the brain hemisphere ipsilateral to the visual field’s deviation. I will review recent neurophysiological, functional neuroimaging, and behavioral studies showing the applications of this new neuromodulation tool and its power for the rehabilitation of cognitive deficits in a variety of populations with neurological damage.
Bio: MD with a specialization in Neurology, after receiving a Ph.D. in neuropsychology from the University of Rome La Sapienza in 2001, Dr. Oliveri completed a post-doctoral fellowship at Harvard Medical School, working with Alvaro Pascual Leone and Alfonso Caramazza. For several years he worked as a researcher at Fondazione Santa Lucia IRCCS of Rome, where he led a brain stimulation group investigating the neurophysiological correlates of cognitive functions. He then joined the psychology department at the University of Palermo, where he is a full professor of cognitive neuroscience. Dr. Oliveri’s main research interests are in the field of non-invasive neuromodulation, using techniques such as TMS, tDCS, and tACS applied in both healthy subjects and patients with brain damage for rehabilitative purposes. Since 2009 he also started investigating the applications of visuomotor adaptation techniques, such as prismatic adaptation, in order to explore their ability to modulate the excitability of brain networks, in addition to the well-known application of rehabilitation of spatial disorders in right brain-damaged patients with spatial neglect. In this field of research, he developed new tools for non-invasive neuromodulation based on the integration of prismatic adaptation with digital medicine solutions. Dr. Oliveri’s work (over 130 publications) has been published in different international journals, including Brain, Science, and Lancet.
Locandina

 

SEMINARIO
Titolo: Network Neuroscience of Autism
Quando: 22 Aprile 2021, ore 17:00
Dove: Il seminario si terrà Online sulla piattaforma Microsoft Teams
Relatore: Lucina Q. Uddin, Department of Psychology, University of Miami
Abstract: Simple “under-connectivity” theories of autism have given way to more nuanced characterizations of the neural basis of disorder. Recent advances in network neuroscience have paved the way for these discoveries, introducing tools and conceptual frameworks that permit exploration of dynamic aspects of brain function. I will review our recent functional neuroimaging studies investigating brain connectivity in autism through a developmental lens. I will illustrate how analysis of brain dynamics can contribute to understanding flexible behaviors in autism, and discuss some of our recent work parsing heterogeneity in neurodevelopmental disorders.
Bio: After receiving a Ph.D. in cognitive neuroscience from the psychology department at UCLA in 2006, Dr. Uddin completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Child Study Center at NYU. For several years she worked as a faculty member in Psychiatry & Behavioral Science at the Stanford School of Medicine. She joined the psychology department at the University of Miami in 2014. Within a cognitive neuroscience framework, Dr. Uddin’s research combines analyses of resting-state fMRI and diffusion-weighted imaging data to examine the organization of large-scale brain networks supporting executive functions. Her current projects focus on understanding dynamic network interactions underlying cognitive inflexibility in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism. Dr. Uddin’s work (over 140 publications) has been published in the Journal of Neuroscience, Cerebral Cortex, JAMA Psychiatry, Biological Psychiatry, PNAS, and Nature Reviews Neuroscience. She was awarded the Young Investigator Award by the Organization for Human Brain Mapping (2017).
Locandina

 

WORKSHOP - ADRIATICA 2020
Titolo: Brain, Body and Adaptive Behavior
Quando
: 8-13 Giugno 2020 - Il workshop è stato rinviato a data da destinarsi a causa della pandemia Covid-19
Link: Adriatica 2020

 

WORKSHOP
Titolo: Neurophysiology of dementia with lewy bodies
Quando: 18 Febbraio 2020, ore 9:30-13:00
Dove: Sala conferenze, CAST
Relatori: Alessandro Padovani, Brescia (Italia); Samuel Cooke, Londra (Regno Unito);  Laura Bonanni, Chieti (Italia); Claudio Babiloni, Roma (Italia)
Locandina

 

SEMINARIO
Titolo: Dynamical connectivity in neuroimaging data: what we look for, how we can(not) find it
Quando: 14 Febbraio 2020, ore 12:00
Dove: Aula Galilei, ITAB
Relatore: Daniele Marinazzo, Università di Ghent (Belgio) 
Abstract: I will give a general (yet personal) overview on dynamical interactions in multivariate systems, and go through some applications to neuroimaging data.
I will insist on the theoretical framework underlying functional connectivity, Granger causality, transfer entropy, dynamic causal models, and stress the importance of considering higher-order interactions.

 

SEMINARIO
Titolo: Sodium imaging: challenges and gains
Quando: 5 Febbraio 2020, ore 11:00
Dove: Aula Galilei, ITAB
Relatore: Claudia Wheeler-Kingshott, University College London (Regno Unito) 
Abstract: Sodium imaging provides direct quantitation of the metabolic state of tissues and integrity of cell membranes in tissue in vivo and has no rival technique able to provide similar information. With the advent of improved hardware and sequences, applications in the brain (and body) show great potential for disease prognosis and treatment monitoring. With the advent of high field scanners, i.e. 7T and beyond, sodium imaging is becoming ever more appealing. Many diseases involve sodium homeostasis breakdown with sodium accumulation in damaged tissue.

 

SEMINARIO
Titolo
: Towards an Objective Evaluation of EEG/MEG Source Estimation Methods
Quando: 23 Gennaio 2020, ore 14:30
Dove: Aula Galilei, palazzina ITAB
Relatore: Olaf Hauk, Università di Cambridge (Regno Unito)
Abstract: The question “What is the spatial resolution of EEG/MEG?” can only be answered with many ifs and buts, as the answer depends on a large number of parameters. Here, we describe a framework for resolution analysis of EEG/MEG source estimation, focusing on linear methods. The spatial resolution of linear methods can be evaluated using the resolution matrix, which contains the point-spread and cross-talk functions (PSFs and CTFs), respectively. They can be used to compute a range of quantitative resolution metrics, which should cover the last three aspects of those functions: localization accuracy, spatial extent, and relative amplitude. Here, we first provide a tutorial-style introduction to resolution analysis of linear source estimation methods. We then apply these concepts to evaluate the benefit of combining EEG and MEG measurements and to compare weighted and normalized L2-minimum-norm estimation and spatial filters. We confirm and extend previous results, showing that adding EEG to MEG improves spatial resolution and that different methods offer different compromises among different resolution criteria.

 

SEMINARIO
Titolo
: La filogenesi dell’encefalo umano come guida per comprendere la storia naturale del glioblastoma cerebrale
Quando: 14 Gennaio 2020, ore 14
Dove: Aula Galilei, palazzina ITAB
Relatore: Alessandro D’Elia, IRCCS Neuromed (Italia)

 

SEMINARIO
Titolo
: Studio prechirurgico di pazienti con tumore cerebrale in aree crtitiche e monitoraggio intra-operatorio in “awake-surgery”: il ruolo del neuropsicologo
Quando: 14 Gennaio 2020, ore 12
Dove: Aula A, Geologia
Relatore: Marco Ciavarro, IRCCS Neuromed (Italia)

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